Vision Loss – Dr. Joshua Groetsch on WVUE FOX 8 News

Vision Loss – Dr. Joshua Groetsch on WVUE FOX 8 News


Ok. And, the time now is 7:20.
You know aches and pains, and all.
A few grey hairs. That’s normal as we age, but there are some signs associated
with aging that are not usual and should be treated immediately. Here to tell us more on
this is Dr. Joshua Groetsch,
a physician from Peoples Health Good morning! Thank you for coming in. This is a really important topic. So many people just think it’s just
a normal part of aging. For example one of the key things is eyesight and vision.
Correct.
What are the things that you start feeling that you shouldn’t
ignore? A lot of times people feel that you know, with age, things are gonna get worse and losing my vision or my vision getting worse is a normal consequence of aging. But, the
reality is, with appropriate screening and appropriate treatment, some of those conditions either can be prevented or even stabilize if they can’t be prevented from getting worse.
As you get older, it’s not uncommon to hear someone say that suddenly their vision seems more blurry than they were in the past. They tend to complain that their night vision is worse. They tend to complain that maybe colors don’t look as vivid as they are used to.
Or they may get a lot of light sensitivity or glare.
The most common causes of vision issues when you get older are mainly in two categories.
Cataracts are the most common cause of reversible vision loss.
That’s a reversal vision loss in one category. The other one would be a irreversible vision loss,
where you have things such as Glaucoma, Age-Related Macular
Degeneration, and Diabetic Retinopathy. Those are the things that unfortunately, as they start to cause vision problems, they cannot necessarily be reversed, but they could be stabilized, assuming you’re getting appropriate treatment So, blurry, pain in the eyes, flashes of light.
Which of the symptoms would you say, if a patient were to tell you that
you would say “that’s ok” but that one “you gotta go and see someone?”
Well, you know, blurred vision in general should just be evacuated because most
of the time it is going to be something benign that’s not of any serious consequence.
However, blurred vision with the association of floaters or flashes
could signify retinal problems. The development of halos or a noticeable loss in peripheral vision could signify the development of Glaucoma.
Glaucoma is important because you don’t necessarily know you have it without screening.
So, that’s why screening becomes important because many of the symptoms that you
get from Glaucoma don’t occur until late in the game. We have Macular Degeneration,
which is the leading cause of blindness in America, basically, over the age of 65.
That generally can cause a loss or decrease in your central vision and a distortion of central vision, where a
straight line suddenly becomes wavy. As you age, you want to maintain your independence.
And that means you want to continue driving. But, what are the signs
that maybe “I think it’s time for me to stop driving,” or for you to tell your loved one
that it’s time to stop driving. Obviously, if you’re night driving or
your night vision becomes an issue, that’s going to make it more difficult to be
on the road safely at nighttime. Blurriness, in general, you should
just get that checked out and evaluated, because there are
certain criteria for every state. It varies a little bit from state to state,
but there are certain criteria that when your vision gets below a certain level,
you’re really legally not supposed to be driving. So, anytime you have a drop your
vision you have to get evaluated, and if that drop is significant enough, you’re technically required that you should notify the DMV, because if you’re stopped on the road
driving when you have certain degree of vision loss or certain degree of
peripheral vision loss.
And how regularly should you be getting your eyes checked as you age?
My last question to you. Generally, every 1-2 years is what I recommend.
Really beyond the age of 40– I’m sorry, beyond the age of 60–Every
year is a good check, because many of those conditions that we talk about
that are irreversible can develop over the course of several months to a years time.
So, early intervals as good at that point to make sure none of those issues
are developing so that you can stop them in their tracks before they get worse.
Yeah, and that’s the key thing. — Getting to everything before it gets worse.
Thank you so much, Dr. Groetsch, a physician from Peoples Health. Thank you so much for coming in this morning.
Much appreciated.
Thanks for having me. Thanks.

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