Top 7 LASIK Questions: Risks, and Is It Worth It?


– Hi guys, I’m Chris Laxamana, and today, we’re gonna answer your top seven questions about LASIK. Just seven, that’s all you get. I had LASIK done over two years ago. I made a video about it, actually. Link to it in the description below. But really quick, if
you’re brand new to LASIK and you’re not familiar with it, let me explain it as simply as I can. LASIK basically is when they use a laser to reshape your cornea which is this thing on the kinda outer part of your eye. I could show you clips. I don’t know if I want to. It might gross you out a little bit. Do you wanna see ’em? Alright. So, they use a laser
to reshape your cornea. The way they do that is they
cut a flap in your cornea. They lift up the flap. They use a laser. They reshape your cornea with the laser. They basically burn your cornea. And then they smooth the flap back over. And then they just kinda squeegee it. And voila you can see. Science! To get professional
answers to our questions, we’re gonna head the Beverly Hills. That’s right, the place
where it all began. The Maloney Vision Institute, where I first got my procedure. We’re gonna speak with Dr. Neda Shamie. I am 90% sure that I
pronounced that name right. Dr. Neda Shamie has over 15
years experience in the field and has done over 6000 procedures. Seriously, this woman knows her stuff. OK, first question. The most popular one. Does LASIK hurt? – Well that’s probably a
better question for you. Although, my answer to that would be my experience with the hundreds
and hundreds of patients who’ve we done LASIK
on, they feel pressure. It shouldn’t be painful. If the pressure you feel, you feel that kinda touching around the eye. But the process is not painful
because we numb the eye. And you’re also given medication that makes you a little
loopy right before, and takes the edge off, correct? – Yeah. – And the process is not painful, and post-op, or after
surgery, is also not painful. Especially with LASIK, because of the way the procedure is done. The nerve endings of the cornea are not exposed so that it’s… Essentially, the eye doesn’t know that it had surgery after surgery. Except for the fact that you can see – Right.
– beautifully. – So yeah, I can confirm
that I didn’t feel pain. What I did feel was terrified. It’s just nerve-racking, that’s it. It’s just you’re scared because (laughing) people like, like doing
stuff to your eyes. I was (bleep) ing scared
(bleep) less the entire time. I was (bleep) ing
scared the entire time. Next question. My eyesight is terrible, like really bad. Can I still get LASIK? – Well it depends on
what really bad means. Yes, so we have done
LASIK on patients who are upwards of -10.0, or -9.0. And the higher the prescription, the more unpredictable it may be. 90% of patients are great
candidates for LASIK, and we make sure that we do all the pre-operative measurements to clear the patient safety-wise. If LASIK is not the best option, we have alternate options. Like, implantable contact lenses and such. – So, yeah, there are
multiple types I guess of different procedures that you can have on your eyes, from LASIK to PRK. If you’re watching this video, you’re probably researching all of those things, like already. Next question, how long does LASIK last? So, if I get the procedure, is my vision gonna suck in two years? Like, is it gonna get worse again? How does that work? – So LASIK can last, or
will last, your lifetime. So the effects of the LASIK that you had will last your lifetime. What can change is the shape of your eye. We do not do LASIK if we feel that there’s progressive change or that there’s change
in your prescriptions. Any history of “well you know, my glasses have been changing
a lot in the last year”. So when you make recommendations, you kinda wait until it stabilizes before we do the LASIK. And as you get older, if you develop cataracts for example, and this is much older, or if the eye changes for other reasons, then you may need touch ups or you may need us to
address those problems. – By the way, if you’re wondering how I’ve been doing two plus years after my LASIK surgery,
I’ve been doing great. T-Z-V-E-C-L. I tested better than 20 20. That is so ridiculously small. – [Woman] I know.
– [Chris] O-H-P-N-T-Z. – [Woman] 20 15. – Holler! (both laugh) – At your age specially, this can last more than a decade. – At my age of 22.
– Your age (laughs) (buzzer buzzing)
Yes, you are quite young. – 24. (buzzer buzzing) 20, 28. (buzzer buzzing) 30.
(buzzer buzzing) Two.
(buzzer buzzing) Age is not important, next question. Side effects. Are there any side effects? Dry eyes, halos, starbursts. If you don’t know what
halos or starbursts are, it’s like looking up at a light at night and seeing a halo around the
light or like a starbursts. Sounds pretty. – Dry eyes could cause halos
or starbursts, definitely. We are really rigorous about making sure that the dry eyes, if it’s there before surgery, if it’s something that
can managed and treated, than we do it ahead of
time to optimize the eye. If it’s related to the contact lens again, because LASIK will take the
patient out of the contact lens, then the dry eye will, in a sense, respond positively to LASIK. Some patients though,
even without dry eyes, can develop symptoms of
dry eyes after LASIK. But usually though it goes away. It goes away within three months or so. In the old times, the old lasers used to create the reshaping of the cornea in such a way that could
cause halos and glare because it wasn’t smooth at the edges and the light would hit at the edge. With this type of laser, and then with the eye design that we do, which is essentially a diagnostic test that is used for in NASA,
for their telescopes. There’s really very little concern about that.
– OK. And just to follow up about that question. I personally have had zero side effects from my LASIK surgery. No dry eyes, no halos, no starbursts. Moving on. What happens if I move my
eyes during the procedure? Like the laser’s shaping my eye and all of a sudden I’m like
“What’s that over there?” And then, crrck-aaah! Permanently blind. Is that a thing? – Very good question actually. It’s the computer device,
actually the imaging device takes an image of your pupil and of your eye, and tracks it. It follows the smaller movements. If you go way out, out of the view, we immediately stop
and then have refixate. We have never had a case that – Right.
– that problem has occurred. – Well let’s take that up a notch. Can you go blind from LASIK? – I have never seen a
single patient of mine or Dr. Maloney’s, go blind from LASIK. – Have you seen the movie
“Final Destination”? – (laughs), yes. – Have you seen–
– Yes. – Have you, if you haven’t don’t watch it. Vegas odds. What are the, like the people that are super scared of getting LASIK out there. – Yes.
– One in a million? One in a thousand?
– Far less, far less. But to go blind blind? It’s one in–
– More of a chance of me getting to go on a
date with Natalie Portman? (Dr. Shamie laughs) – There’s probably a higher chance you’ll be able to go on a
date with Natalie Portman. The only situation I can
imagine that has been reported, is patients who may
have really bad glaucoma or if you have a really bad infection. The chances are so slim,
publications after publications, the safety reports on
LASIK is really high, if the proper instrumentation is used, if advanced technology is used, if the proper expert is doing the surgery. I can’t vouch for strip mall LASIK, but I can tell you if it’s done right, the way you did it, much higher chance of you having a date with Natalie Portman.
– Wink, wink, nudge, nudge. Yeah, exactly.
(Dr. Shamie laughs) And finally, question number
seven, the last question. How much does it cost? This question I will take right here. LASIK varies. The prices for LASIK range, on average, I would say anywhere from 1500 to 3000 dollars per eye. So like, both eyes, that’s what, 3000 to 6000 dollars on average. I ended up spending a little more. The Maloney Vision
Institute, those guys are like the epitome of professionals. Accolades. (bright music) They’re pioneers. Dr. Maloney, the guy that
performed my LASIK surgery, was one of the first doctors to perform LASIK in North America. If there is one place that I didn’t want to look for a discount, it was on eye surgery. They’re your eyes. I don’t know. You do you. My advice would just be, go to a place that’s tried-and-true. That has plenty of reviews. Ideally go to a place that
somebody you know has been to, and can vouch for. I’m happy with my results. I’m glad I got LASIK. I have better than 20/20 vision and I’ve got no side effects. So if you’re thinking about getting LASIK, I highly recommend it. If you live in California, I recommend the Maloney Vision Institute. No, I’m not getting paid for this video. Dr. Neda Shamie, thank you so much. – It was nice to meet you. – That’s great. – So excited that you’re doing so well. – We’ve got the whole team in here. – [Dr. Shamie] Yes we do. – If you liked spending
time with me today, lick that subscribe button. Don’t, don’t lick it. That is extremely unsanitary. You don’t know where that button’s been. Just give it a little tap. I’m not always gonna
make videos about LASIK, because really, I can only have it once. But I’m gonna make other videos. Maybe I’ll climb a mountain. Maybe I’ll take up salsa dancing. Maybe I’ll practice sheep hurting. Not hurting them, like hitting
them, but herding them. I’m not a , I’m not, I wouldn’t, I’d never hurt a sheep. I digress. Thank you for watching. Peace!

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