Researcher comment: The C-VIEW 48-week interim results | Irene van der Horst-Bruinsma

Researcher comment: The C-VIEW 48-week interim results | Irene van der Horst-Bruinsma


[MUSIC PLAYING] The C-VIEW trial’s
very interesting– because it’s one of the limited
trials that has been performed in axial SpA– to see whether the TNF inhibitor
Cimzia, the certolizumab pegol, is able not only to reduce
disease activity in ankylosing spondylitis, but also recurrence
rate of uveitis, anterior uveitis, which is pretty common
in AS, as you might well know. In addition, we did not
only tested an ankylosing spondylitis, but also in
non-radiographic axial SpA patients, which is new. That hasn’t been done before. So we know it’s a challenge
to treat the patient with AS with a proper drug. And we have several
options to choose. Among TNF inhibitors,
some other studies have been done on adalimumab
and golimumab which show that early
recurrence rate of uveitis is decreased by
use of this drug. So this is the first trial
on the Cimzia, certolizumab, and we, I’m going to
present the interim results at 48 weeks of the study, which
is a European study in five countries. And that includes 85 patients. And it shows a massive
reduction recurrence rate. We included patients with a very
high risk of anterior uveitis, because they had to
be HLA-B27 positive. That’s one which is strongly
associated with uveitis. And in addition,
they had to have had a previous history of
anterior uveitis of at least one attack in the last year
and at least two attacks in the longer periods. So when we included
these patients based on disease activity
on ankylosing spondylitis, we found that the treatment
with Cimzia, or certolizumab, reduced dramatically their
number of uveitis attacks during treatment, compared
to the pre-treatment period. So the improvement there
was 87% reduction rate. So it’s pretty high. The safety profile is the
same with other trials and that the efficacy on
clinical disease activity was also the same compared to
other TNF inhibitor trials. So that’s not different at all. If you have patients
with recurrent uveitis, it’s often a challenge
to find the proper drug and ophthalmologists usually
give pretty high dosages of corticosteroids, which
have a lot of side effects, as we all know. Not only systemically, but
also for the eye itself. So if there are patients
with ankylosing spondylitis with either one or two
attacks of uveitis, it could be helpful to
choose for a drug that is beneficial for both diseases. It’s very interesting
to mention that we also test this in non-radiographic
axial SpA, which hasn’t been done before. And it shows the same
decrease in recurrence rate of uveitis compared to
radiographic axial SpA, or ankylosing spondylitis. So that’s new. And I hope that
this will help us. If we have the options to choose
between which TNF inhibitors we should give to the
patients with active disease, this will help in the
decision, which is the best drug for this patient. [MUSIC PLAYING]

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