Paul Weber, MD, Glaucoma Specialist

Paul Weber, MD, Glaucoma Specialist


I’m Dr. Paul Weber. I am a professor of Ophthalmology and I currently
serve as director of the Glaucoma Division, so my specialty is glaucoma. I grew up in a small rural town in southern
Illinois; one of nine kids. My love affair with Ohio State started when
I was recruited to run track here and I still run. Well I think it’s great being here at The
Ohio State University. We’re one of the leaders in personalized care
and right now glaucoma, every patient is different. And we have to personalize the care of each
patient. But in the near future I believe that genetics
are going to allow us to further identify who’s going to respond to which medicine so
that we don’t waste the patient’s time and money trying a medicine that is unlikely to
work. I think we’ll have a much better idea of which
types of patients are going to respond to certain types of surgery. So I’m very excited about what’s coming down
the road in the very near future in glaucoma care. We have a new laser and surgical procedures
to control the eye pressure, so our success in diagnosing glaucoma, our ability to detect
progression earlier and our treatment modalities have greatly enhanced our ability to preserve
patients’ vision. We’re currently working on a lot of clinical
trials on the biomechanics properties of the eye wall. We feel that this is going to give us a clue
into why certain eyes develop glaucoma and others don’t, and eventually to new ways to
both diagnose glaucoma and treat glaucoma. The most rewarding thing is the inspiration
that patients give me. Most many of my patients have life threatening
conditions with glaucoma and to see the how they handle the challenges that are put in
front of them and how they overcome the obstacles really is inspiring. I guess one of the most moving stories was
I operated on a three-month-old girl for congenital glaucoma and when she was sixteen she came
into the office and her mother said, aren’t you going to show him? And she pulled out her driver’s license, and
gave me a hug and thanked me for being able to drive; do the operation that we did when
she was three months old. Patients can expect that I will take the time
that they need to explain to them what is going on with their eyes, what we need to
do, what options we have available. Patients will understand that I care about
them, not just about their glaucoma, but about them as a person and they know that I will
give my very best to preserve their vision. They also can be assured that I will treat
them just as I would want myself to be treated.

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