Optician Craft: Playing with Custom Lens Shapes


– Hello and welcome to the Laramy-K OpticianWorks Training Center. Where this week I’m giving you something a little bit different. (energetic, bouncy music) Like I said, something
kind of special this week. Obviously I’m not in my usual place, wearing my usual attire. This is very off the
cuff, I’m actually in, I mean literally in the middle of, working on some lenses for another video series that we’re doing. One that kind of snowballed,
but you are gonna love when we finally get it pulled together. I need to create a set
of four identical lenses, and I want those lenses
to be a very unique shape, with some very unique features. So, rather than just do
that behind the scenes I’m gonna actually kind of
let you watch what I’m doing, Talk about it a little bit and I think maybe you’ll get a little
bit better idea about some of the things you can do by hand and just how much some
of these lenses can take. This is a lens pattern blank, and you don’t see these very much anymore. They are still available and
as you’re about to find out, they still can come in quite useful. Most frames obviously are wider in the A than they are in the B. So normally one would
hold the pattern this way. What I’m gonna do, because
this is a very special test that I’m gonna be working on. I’m actually gonna turn it
like this and my goal here is to cut four lenses
in the identical shape and basically what I’m trying for is kind of like a skull look, okay? So, what I’m gonna do is, this will be the top of my head, this will be my chin. So, I think the first
thing I’m gonna do is I’ve got my 35 mark and my 30, I think I’m just gonna
kind of cut across that and cut across that. So that gives me kind of my chin there. And what I’m gonna do is I’m gonna I’m gonna try to take this
file here and do this. I don’t think I’m gonna be able to, I’m probably going to have
to take it into the workshop. I’ll move everything in there. But let me see if I can just… Well that’s not too bad, I
can kind of live with that. I’ve got a little skull
action going there. Alright, and eventually I’m
gonna want some eye holes. So let’s set up for that. I’m gonna just grab my drill index here Make it a decent sized hole, let’s go with quarter inch here. Again I can use kind of, go right in between my 25 and my 25. Why don’t we go ahead and mark that. And just keep in mind, all
I’m doing here is playing. I’m trying to visualize what
my final lens will look like. Play, experiment, have a little fun. Yeah those look pretty good. Alright, I’m gonna drill
a hole right there. That looks pretty good. Again, I would obviously
probably do this in a vice but my lighting and
everything is good here, so. (drill whirring) Alright so hopefully you can kind of see where I’m going with this. We’ve got our chin down here, we’ve got our two eyes and somehow we’re gonna
have to make a little face a little smile kind of thing down here. I’m gonna have to wait on that I think I’m gonna have to do that on the lens. I don’t wanna mess this up
because I’m gonna need this to hold it in the edger. So that’s kind of about as far as we can go with this at the moment. What I’m gonna do, I’ll
show you in just a second, I’m gonna touch it off on the hand stone so that this is nice and
smooth when it hits the edger. I simply know from personal
experience and just time, I’ve made a lot of patterns in my life, that the smoother the
edge of the pattern is, the better results you’re gonna have. Crucial, if you have a hand stone and you’re working with a
pattern by all means do this. Keep feeling the edge with your finger even the slightest little bump will show up in your final product. When all was said and done,
after some trial and error, some experimentation, trying
the pattern in the edger, this is what I actually ended up with. And this was I think maybe four, maybe five attempts working
through this pattern. Bringing it back out into the shop. Doing some more hand stone work, doing some more grinding, filing, and at last after much trial and error it was finally ready for the edger. Now the reason I’m using a pattern rather than trying to do
this with individual lenses, is because I want consistency. I want to be able to duplicate the shape over and over again in case, you know, I ever wanted to use it again. Obviously I could keep this pattern around if I had an old edger. Of course a nice, beautiful new one lets me save this shape and there it is. So I could actually recall it
up again anytime I wanted to. I’m far from a great artist at this stuff but the thing I want you
to take away from this, is just don’t be scared. A polycarbonate lens, a trivex lens, single vision, no bells, no whistles. You’re talking about a couple of dollars. Don’t be scared to experiment. There is nothing that I’ve used here today nothing that you’re gonna
see that was special. I’m using basic hand tools, a crummy old file out
of my toolbox drawer, a regular dremel tool with
an ordinary drill bit. Guys there’s nothing special,
this was not a, you know, a $300 add-on special Drydex
drill bit or something. It’s just something that I
pulled out of the workbench. Lens blank, did it all by hand, I cut, I sanded, I smoothed, I went on the wheel, I
used my own grinding stone. I started with it, it was
a little bit too large, put it into the edger, it didn’t
work, I had to take it out. For every success, you’re
gonna have ten failures when you’re doing this stuff. So you have to practice. (tape rewinding) For every success, you’re
gonna have ten failures when you’re doing this stuff. So you have to practice. (tape rewinding) So you have to practice. In fact, if you noticed my
original holes that I drilled once I had to make this smaller, so that it worked in the edger, they don’t line up anymore. So what did I have to do? I had to create another template. So that’s what I’m gonna do now. I’m gonna take these lenses,
put them over my template, and drill a bunch of holes in them. (drill whirring) Obviously these are not going to be in the next issue of Lens Fancy Magazine. But they certainly will do
the job for what I need. What I really want you to
take away from this is, again, just don’t be scared. Try this stuff, do it,
pick up some lenses, practice, play around with it,
and with time, with practice, you can actually make a truly
handcrafted pair of glasses. As always, thanks for watching, and I will see you again next week.

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